Things not to say to someone grieving…

In my life I have lost two of the most important people that anyone can lose, my mother and my father. My mom passed on 03/17/2011 at 54 and my dad on 11/29/2017 at 61. There have been other people who I have lost and who I’ve grieved for, but losing a parent is different than an aunt, uncle, grandparent. Of course you have a relationship with them, but the people who raised you leave such an impact on your life. In the last 6 years, 10 months, I’ve heard many different things that people have said to me or others grieving.

When I lost my mom people told me she was in a better place, some told me I needed to get over it, others said she wouldn’t want me to be sad. At the time I had others who called and asked me if Facebook posts they were seeing on her page were true. Some people may joke around about death or losing their parents, but I was not that way. Everyone grieves in their own way and while she is in a better place, telling someone that right after someone passes may not be the best thing to say, neither is telling someone to get over the death of a loved one because we will never be over no matter how much time passes.

Recently at some doctor’s appointments and other appointments, people told me my dad was in a better place, no longer in pain, etc. And I know him being in pain no longer is a huge relief for me because of his numerous health issues, and while his death came quick, I had a chance for closure with him that I didn’t get with my mom, but again with his passing I have heard comments from people again telling me he wouldn’t want me to be sad or cry, that he would want me to move on with my life. The most recent comment which hurt more than the others was when I recently went to a walk-in clinic for this upper respiratory stuff that’s been going around this winter. A doctor was getting a little bit of history on me, if I had siblings, my parents, what I do for work. When I told the I lost both of my parents and was an only child this doctor said, “So that makes you an orphan now”. And by the true definition of an orphan that statement is true, why would you say that to someone who had only lost their father five weeks previously?!

Some of the best things you can do for someone grieving is offer to go to the funeral home with them to make arrangements, take them out to lunch or dinner, spend a weekend day with them, bring over a home cooked meal so they don’t have to worry about cooking for a night, let them call you and listen to them cry if they need to, or just to vent. There are so many productive ways to help someone who is grieving rather than saying they are in a better place or they wouldn’t want you to be sad, because while that may be true, words can hurt even if they are meant in the best possible way. We learn to live without them in our lives, but there will always be things that trigger us and make us relive the day we lost them.

Advertisements